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DieHardBrownsFan

FDA warns against drugs endorsed by Trump for COVID-19ūü§£

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Let me see. A person has the virus and their symptoms are worsening. Going on a ventilator might be the next option. (For some reason with all the dissing of hyydroxychloroquine the media doesn't report the horrible failure rates of those placed on ventilators).

Since there are no other drug alternatives to take the plan is to do nothing but wait and if your breathing gets worse you get placed on a ventilator which we know has a high history of failure.

Or you have the option of asking your doctor to take hydroxychloroquine, zpac and zinc cocktail in hopes it might help There are lots of stories of people saying it helped them. There are a lot of doctors who recommend it for covid19. I would take the drugs.

I don't care if someone doesn't like the drug, doesn't think it works whatever.....For those people just don't take it if you don't want it...simple.nobody is forcing you to take it...just don't take away the rights of others who may want to at least try it instead of the alternative of nothing.

Why doesn't our media report much on this stat about ventilators failure rates in NYC?

80% of NYC's coronavirus patients who are put on ventilators ultimately die, and some doctors are trying to stop using them

https://www.businessinsider.com/coronavirus-ventilators-some-doctors-try-reduce-use-new-york-death-rate-2020-4

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You realize that people who are put on ventilators have to be, or they will die?

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Just now, DieHardBrownsFan said:

You realize that people who are put on ventilators have to be, or they will die?

We have testimonies of covid19 patients who were close to being placed on a ventilator and before that last option took the hydroxychloroquine, zpack and zinc combo and they got better and did not have to be placed on a ventilator. I would want to try it myself.

 

 

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2 hours ago, OldBrownsFan said:

Let me see. A person has the virus and their symptoms are worsening. Going on a ventilator might be the next option. (For some reason with all the dissing of hyydroxychloroquine the media doesn't report the horrible failure rates of those placed on ventilators).

Since there are no other drug alternatives to take the plan is to do nothing but wait and if your breathing gets worse you get placed on a ventilator which we know has a high history of failure.

Or you have the option of asking your doctor to take hydroxychloroquine, zpac and zinc cocktail in hopes it might help There are lots of stories of people saying it helped them. There are a lot of doctors who recommend it for covid19. I would take the drugs.

I don't care if someone doesn't like the drug, doesn't think it works whatever.....For those people just don't take it if you don't want it...simple.nobody is forcing you to take it...just don't take away the rights of others who may want to at least try it instead of the alternative of nothing.

Why doesn't our media report much on this stat about ventilators failure rates in NYC?

80% of NYC's coronavirus patients who are put on ventilators ultimately die, and some doctors are trying to stop using them

https://www.businessinsider.com/coronavirus-ventilators-some-doctors-try-reduce-use-new-york-death-rate-2020-4

Have you notice that the Dems haven't come up with anything but yet bitch and moan because Trump tries to come up with ideas.

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FDA?  seriously they havent found  a product they didn't like 

care for the citizens of USA?  pfft

must be that HYdroxychlouroquin zpac and zinc don't hold any favorable $$ value that the FDA overlords can then embezzle?

 

And echoes with the sound of salesmen
Of salesmen, of salesmen   
Geddy Lee

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26 minutes ago, LogicIsForSquares said:

I prefer to follow the big brain’s suggestion for what I should do if I get Corona.

 

2B0B5929-937C-4B8A-9949-520767AEA587.jpeg

Typical Democrat sounds like something they would do.

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7 hours ago, FairHooker11 said:

FDA?  seriously they havent found  a product they didn't like 

care for the citizens of USA?  pfft

must be that HYdroxychlouroquin zpac and zinc don't hold any favorable $$ value that the FDA overlords can then embezzle?

 

And echoes with the sound of salesmen
Of salesmen, of salesmen   
Geddy Lee

Hydroxychloroquine, zpac and zinc costs? The doctor in NY who said they had a lot of success with it said the total costs per patient was about 30 bucks. HDQ is a cheap easily mfg drug that the patent has run out on. There is no money in it for big pharma. As for safety HDQ has a decades long record of being safe. I recently saw one doctor on television who has prescribed HDQ for decades say that in 40 years of prescribing the drug they never had any issues except minor ones such such as a rash  but never anything that would cause someone to be hospitalized. 

The anecdotal evidence for HDQ seems to be the earlier you take it the better the chances are it will work for you but what the FDA is doing now by wanting it to be only be prescribed for hospitalized patients ensures that only the worst patients are going to be able to take it. 

Again for me I don't care what anyone else believes and if they wouldn't touch HDQ with a ten foot pole if they had the virus that is their right. People should have the right to take it though if they choose so and if they want to take it earlier in the course of the virus vs waiting until a patient is in critical condition they should be allowed that choice

I agree with those saying that those with Lupus or other diseases who depend on HDQ should have the first priority over covid19 patients because we know it works for them and they depend on it. Fortunately since it is a cheap easily mfg drug we do not have a shortage. 

 

 

 

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Media Hype Estrogen For Men As Coronavirus Treatment After Trashing Chloroquine

The New York Times and other major media outlets are hyping estrogen for men as a new experimental treatment for the coronavirus and are applying little if any of the skepticism they've shown towards chloroquine.

Whereas every possible side effect of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have been highlighted ad nauseam and junk studies were wildly hyped to suggest it's killing people en masse, you'd think by reading the media's headlines that giving men estrogen was a panacea.

"Men are dying from coronavirus at higher rates. Could estrogen save them?" said one headline from Mic.

"Can Estrogen and Other Sex Hormones Help Men Survive Covid-19?" said a headline from the New York Times.

Roni Caryn Rabin in the New York Times hyped the gender-bending treatment in her article titled, "Can Estrogen and Other Sex Hormones Help Men Survive Covid-19?":

As the novel coronavirus swept through communities around the world,¬†preying disproportionately on the poor and the vulnerable, one disadvantaged group has demonstrated a remarkable resistance. Women, whether from China, Italy or the U.S., have been less likely to become acutely ill ‚ÄĒ and far more likely to survive.

Which has made doctors wonder: Could hormones produced in greater quantities by women be at work?

Now scientists on two coasts, acting quickly on their hunches in an effort to save men's lives, are testing the hypothesis. The two clinical trials will each dose men with the sex hormones for limited durations.

Last week, doctors on Long Island in New York started treating Covid-19 patients with estrogen in an effort to increase their immune systems, and next week, physicians in Los Angeles will start treating male patients with another hormone that is predominantly found in women, progesterone, which has anti-inflammatory properties and can potentially prevent harmful overreactions of the immune system.

Note: doctors giving out estrogen to "increase" men's immune systems is just fine but doctors giving out intravenous vitamin C to boost folks immune systems get raided by the FBI.

"There's a striking difference between the number of men and women in the intensive care unit, and men are clearly doing worse," said Dr. Sara Ghandehari, a pulmonologist and intensive care physician at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles who is the principal investigator for the progesterone study. She said 75 percent of the hospital's intensive care patients and those on ventilators are men.

And pregnant women, who are usually immunocompromised but have high levels of estrogen and progesterone, tend to have mild courses of the disease. "So something about being a woman is protective, and something about pregnancy is protective, and that makes us think about hormones," Dr. Ghandehari said.

Rabin waited until paragraph 7 to inform readers of the (mildest) side effects:

Some experts who study sex differences in immunity, however, warned that hormones may fail to be the magic bullet that some are hoping for; even elderly women with Covid-19 are outliving their male peers, and there is a drastic reduction in levels of hormones for women after menopause.

She also included one line in the final paragraph (number 27) noting potential side effects:

Both hormones are believed to be safe, especially when used for short durations. Participants will be warned of possible side effects that may be a first for many men, like tenderness in the breast and hot flashes.

Drugs.com has a list of side effects for progesterone a mile long -- which include death.

The most common are listed as "chest pain, chills, cold or flu-like symptoms, cough or hoarseness, fever" and "problems with urination."

I guess Times readers are only entitled to know of the side effects of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine!

As I reported two weeks ago, the media also hyped the expensive and unproven Gilead drug Remdesivir with little skepticism based off a single report citing leaked information that may have been part of an insider trading scam.

A later leaked report found the much-hyped Remdesivir "flopped" during its first clinical trial.

http://www.informationliberation.com/?id=61409

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7 minutes ago, DieHardBrownsFan said:

Hopes dashed as coronavirus drug remdesivir 'fails first trial'

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-52406261

New data on Gilead’s remdesivir, released by accident, show no benefit for coronavirus patients. Company still sees reason for hope

https://www.statnews.com/2020/04/23/data-on-gileads-remdesivir-released-by-accident-show-no-benefit-for-coronavirus-patients/

Gilead Tumbles After Latest Data Leak on Virus Drug Trials

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-04-23/gilead-plunges-after-report-that-chinese-trial-was-unsuccessful

 

Experimental coronavirus drug remdesivir fails in human trial: Report

https://www.indiatoday.in/world/story/experimental-coronavirus-drug-remdesivir-fails-in-human-trial-report-1670432-2020-04-24

 

 

 

 

 

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The newest study says it is promising.

 

New results from a clinical trial conducted by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases establish the drug as the standard of care for Covid-19, which has killed 50,000 people in the U.S. so far, said agency Director Anthony Fauci. He likened the good news about remdesivir to the discovery of the first medicine found to help treat HIV more than three decades ago.

Advertisement

"The data shows that remdesivir has a clear-cut, significant positive effect in diminishing the time to recover," Fauci told reporters hours after Gilead said promising data was incoming from NIAID's sweeping trial, which involved 1,063 patients.

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If Remdisvir is proven to be more effective than hyrdroxychloroquine, zpack and zinc combo i am all for it. I wanted people to take Hydroxychloroquine because we have an empty medicine bag right now and there are a number of testimonies from people who claim it helped them. With no other alternative I wanted patients to be able to take HCQ with approval from their doctors and not have governors making the decision for them. If they find better alternatives than Remdisvir I am all for that as well. With a vaccine still a long ways off I want us to continually try to find better treatments.

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27 minutes ago, OldBrownsFan said:

If Remdisvir is proven to be more effective than hyrdroxychloroquine, zpack and zinc combo i am all for it. I wanted people to take Hydroxychloroquine because we have an empty medicine bag right now and there are a number of testimonies from people who claim it helped them. With no other alternative I wanted patients to be able to take HCQ with approval from their doctors and not have governors making the decision for them. If they find better alternatives than Remdisvir I am all for that as well. With a vaccine still a long ways off I want us to continually try to find better treatments.

Me too.  

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I'm sick of this fucking COVID-19.  My daughter and grand kids were supposed to visit end of May.  Now I don't know when I will see them.

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53 minutes ago, DieHardBrownsFan said:

I'm sick of this fucking COVID-19.  My daughter and grand kids were supposed to visit end of May.  Now I don't know when I will see them.

it's sad all over. My Wife wants to go see her Dad, he's goin on 98, but can't. The social isolation is tough on the really elderly.

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I don't care about politicizing any drug because when it comes to this virus it doesn't care about who it strikes. I just want us to use the best most effective drugs we have but I feel right now at this moment it is hydroxychloroquine with zpack and zinc added for patients with early symptoms of covid19.  I found it odd with Dr. Fauci how hesitant he was to endorse HCQ with so many testimonies of it's success but I understood it as he is a scientist and wants more facts however Fauci sure jumped in feet first with endorsing Remdisvir (without much study) which the costs right now are $1,000 a pill vs the .30 cents a pill for HCQ. I am getting skeptical in my older age and starting to take notice of the wisdom of the old saying of "always follow the money trail" when seeking answers. 

I heard Laura Ingraham say she gets calls from doctors all over the world wondering why the United States is panning HCQ when they have seen it's positive effects? I think the answer is there is no money in HCQ for big pharmaceutical companies.  I am glad to see studies being conducted to back up the anecdotal evidence of HCQ effectiveness but even the doctor who has had so much success with HCQ states that the effectiveness primarily works in patients with early symptoms of the virus and works to keep them progressing symptoms to where they are placed on ventilators. As we race to build more ventilators NYC had an 80 percent failure and death rate of those whose symptoms had reached the critical point of being placed on a ventilators leaving no doubt ventilators are no solution for those critically ill buy maybe HCQ does work to keep many patients from reaching critical condition?

I will be glad when we get real studies done on HCQ and not those like the sham study of the VA. There are people though right now who don't have the luxury of time to wait on the studies and for those people I like the idea they at least have the choice to take HCQ with their doctors approval and not have politicians taking that choice away from them.

I am for any drug that works and will support any drug that works best but I am skeptical that big pharmacy has those same feelings. 

HCQ Works, Says Group of US Doctors. Fauci Pushes His Pet Drug

https://creativedestructionmedia.com/analysis/2020/04/30/red-flag-fauci-forces-remdesivir-approval-as-aaps-confirms-hcq-cures-91/

Coronavirus Drug Exclusive: Meet The Doctor Behind The Hydroxychloroquine Treatment, And What’s Next For Its Use

https://newyork.cbslocal.com/2020/04/30/coronavirus-exclusive-meet-the-doctor-behind-the-hydroxychloroquine-treatment-for-covid-19/

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There are many side effects with Hydoxychoroquine also, mostly heart rythm related.  And who cares how much it costs?  I wouldn't pay a penny, it would be covered.

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15 minutes ago, DieHardBrownsFan said:

There are many side effects with Hydoxychoroquine also, mostly heart rythm related.  And who cares how much it costs?  I wouldn't pay a penny, it would be covered.

There are little side effects with HCQ and that has been proven over many decades. It has a decades long history of a safety record.  A leading doctor who has prescribed HCQ for 40 years for patients with lupus or malaria said the only side effects they ever encountered were mild such as a rash and never anything where someone had to be hospitalized. The possible side effects with heart issues are adding the zpac and that is why doctors need to be involved in prescribing the cocktail of HCQ, zpac and zinc combo. Patients with heart conditions may not be a candidate but that issue should be discussed with the doctor and their patients and not any politician making that decision for them.

There is no free lunch. You might have the $1,000 a pill paid free of charge but as that $1,000 a pill is used in mass quantities somebody will be footing the bill and those costs always get passed back on to consumers. 

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On ‚Äé4‚Äé/‚Äé25‚Äé/‚Äé2020 at 12:13 AM, LogicIsForSquares said:

I prefer to follow the big brain’s suggestion for what I should do if I get Corona.

 

2B0B5929-937C-4B8A-9949-520767AEA587.jpeg

Exactly.  You and how many other liberals cause your so smart. Drink up.

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15 minutes ago, OldBrownsFan said:

There are little side effects with HCQ and that has been proven over many decades.

I beg to differ:

  1. Drugs A to Z
  2. Hydroxychloroquine

Hydroxychloroquine

 

Generic Name: hydroxychloroquine (hye drox ee KLOR oh kwin)
Brand Names: Plaquenil, Quineprox

Medically reviewed by Sanjai Sinha, MD Last updated on Mar 17, 2019.

What is hydroxychloroquine?

Hydroxychloroquine is a quinoline medicine used to treat or prevent malaria, a disease caused by parasites that enter the body through the bite of a mosquito. Malaria is common in areas such as Africa, South America, and Southern Asia. This medicine is not effective against all strains of malaria.

Hydroxychloroquine is also an antirheumatic medicine and is used to treat symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and discoid or systemic lupus erythematosus.

Important information

Taking hydroxychloroquine long-term or at high doses may cause irreversible damage to the retina of your eye. Stop taking this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have trouble focusing, if you see light streaks or flashes in your vision, or if you notice any swelling or color changes in your eyes.

Before using hydroxychloroquine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have psoriasis, porphyria, liver disease, alcoholism, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency.

Call a poison control center at once and then seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of hydroxychloroquine can be fatal, especially in children.

Take hydroxychloroquine for the full prescribed length of time for malaria. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

When treating lupus or arthritis, tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 months of treatment.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use hydroxychloroquine if you are allergic to it.

Hydroxychloroquine should not be used for long-term treatment in children.

To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • a history of vision changes or damage to your retina caused by an anti-malaria medication;

  • heart disease, heart rhythm disorder (such as long QT syndrome);

  • diabetes;

  • a stomach disorder;

  • an allergy to quinine;

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • psoriasis;

  • alcoholism; or

  • a genetic enzyme disorder such as porphyria or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency.

It is not known whether hydroxychloroquine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Malaria is more likely to cause death in a pregnant woman. If you are pregnant, talk with your doctor about the risks of traveling to areas where malaria is common.

It is not known whether hydroxychloroquine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Hydroxychloroquine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take hydroxychloroquine?

Take hydroxychloroquine exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Hydroxychloroquine is sometimes given only once per week. Choose the same day each week to take this medicine if you are on a weekly dosing schedule.

Take hydroxychloroquine with a meal or a glass of milk.

To prevent malaria: Start taking the medicine 2 weeks before entering an area where malaria is common. Continue taking the medicine regularly during your stay and for at least 8 weeks after you leave the area.

To treat malaria: Hydroxychloroquine is usually given for 3 days, starting with one high dose followed by a smaller dose during the next 2 days in a row.

Take this medicine for the full prescribed length of time for malaria. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

Use protective clothing, insect repellents, and mosquito netting around your bed to further prevent mosquito bites that could cause malaria.

Call your doctor as soon as possible if you have been exposed to malaria, or if you have fever or other symptoms of illness during or after a stay in an area where malaria is common.

No medication is 100% effective in treating or preventing all types of malaria. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if you have fever, vomiting, or diarrhea during your treatment.

When treating lupus or arthritis, hydroxychloroquine is usually given daily for several weeks or months. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 months of treatment.

While using hydroxychloroquine, you may need frequent blood tests and vision exams.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

See also:

Hydroxychloroquine dosage information (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of hydroxychloroquine can be fatal, especially in children.

Hydroxychloroquine overdose must be treated quickly. You may be told to induce vomiting right away (at home, before transport to an emergency room). Ask the poison control center how to induce vomiting in the case of an overdose.

Overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, vision changes, slow heart rate, chest pain, severe dizziness, seizure (convulsions), or shallow breathing.

What should I avoid while taking hydroxychloroquine?

Avoid taking an antacid or Kaopectate (kaolin-pectin) within 4 hours before or after you take hydroxychloroquine. Some antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hydroxychloroquine.

Hydroxychloroquine side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to hydroxychloroquine: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Taking hydroxychloroquine long-term or at high doses may cause irreversible damage to the retina of your eye. Stop taking this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have trouble focusing, if you see light streaks or flashes in your vision, or if you notice any swelling or color changes in your eyes.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • headache with chest pain and severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats;

  • very slow heart rate, weak pulse;

  • muscle weakness, numbness or tingling;

  • low blood sugar¬†- headache, hunger, sweating, irritability, dizziness, nausea, fast heart rate, and feeling anxious or shaky; or

  • low blood cell counts¬†- fever, chills, sore throat, weakness or ill feeling, swollen gums, mouth sores, skin sores, rapid heart rate, pale skin, easy bruising, unusual bleeding, feeling light-headed.

Common hydroxychloroquine side effects may include:

  • headache, dizziness, ringing in your ears;

  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;

  • loss of appetite, weight loss;

  • mood changes, feeling nervous or irritable;

  • skin rash or itching; or

  • hair loss.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also:

Hydroxychloroquine side effects (in more detail)

Hydroxychloroquine dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria:

Treatment of the acute attack: 800 mg (620 mg base) followed in 6 to 8 hours by 400 mg (310 mg base), then 400 mg (310 mg base) once a day for 2 consecutive days; alternatively, a single dose of 800 mg (620 mg base) has also been effective

Dosage on the basis of body weight:
First dose: 10 mg base/kg (not to exceed 620 mg base)
Second dose: 5 mg base/kg (not to exceed 310 mg base) 6 hours after first dose
Third dose: 5 mg base/kg 18 hours after second dose
Fourth dose: 5 mg base/kg 24 hours after third dose

Each dose should be taken with a meal or a glass of milk.

Concomitant therapy with an 8-aminoquinoline drug is necessary for the radical cure of vivax and malariae malaria.

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria Prophylaxis:

Suppression: 400 mg (310 mg base) orally on the same day every week

Suppressive therapy should begin 2 weeks prior to exposure; however, failing this, an initial dose of 800 mg (620 mg base) may be taken in 2 divided doses (6 hours apart). Suppressive therapy should continue for 8 weeks after leaving the endemic area.

Each dose should be taken with a meal or a glass of milk.

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis:

Initial dose: 400 to 600 mg (310 to 465 mg base) orally once a day
Maintenance dose: 200 to 400 mg (155 to 310 mg base) orally once a day

Each dose should be taken with a meal or a glass of milk.

Usual Adult Dose for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus:

Discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus:
Initial dose: 400 mg (310 mg base) orally once or twice a day for several weeks or months, depending on patient response
Maintenance dose: 200 to 400 mg (155 to 310 mg base) orally once a day

Each dose should be taken with a meal or a glass of milk.

 

Hydroxychloroquine can cause serious liver or heart problems, especially if you use certain medicines at the same time, including:

  • other medicines to treat malaria;

  • an antibiotic or antifungal medicine;

  • antiviral medicine to treat hepatitis or HIV/AIDS;

  • antidepressants or antipsychotic medicines;

  • birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy;

  • cancer medication;

  • cholesterol-lowering medication;

  • heart or blood pressure medicine;

  • pain or arthritis medicines (including aspirin, Tylenol, Advil, and Aleve);

  • seizure medication;

  • stomach acid reducers; or

  • tuberculosis medicine.

This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with hydroxychloroquine. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide. Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with hydroxychloroquine. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

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Do what you want. There is a mountain of evidence of the safety of HCQ being prescribed for decades with little side effects and  even pregnant women being prescribed it. If you get the virus and don't want to take HCQ there is a simple remedy....just say you don't want it. As for me I would take it. My problem are those who want to take the decision away from patients and their doctors.

 

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20 minutes ago, DieHardBrownsFan said:

I beg to differ:

  1. Drugs A to Z
  2. Hydroxychloroquine

Hydroxychloroquine

 

Generic Name: hydroxychloroquine (hye drox ee KLOR oh kwin)
Brand Names: Plaquenil, Quineprox

Medically reviewed by Sanjai Sinha, MD Last updated on Mar 17, 2019.

What is hydroxychloroquine?

Hydroxychloroquine is a quinoline medicine used to treat or prevent malaria, a disease caused by parasites that enter the body through the bite of a mosquito. Malaria is common in areas such as Africa, South America, and Southern Asia. This medicine is not effective against all strains of malaria.

Hydroxychloroquine is also an antirheumatic medicine and is used to treat symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and discoid or systemic lupus erythematosus.

Important information

Taking hydroxychloroquine long-term or at high doses may cause irreversible damage to the retina of your eye. Stop taking this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have trouble focusing, if you see light streaks or flashes in your vision, or if you notice any swelling or color changes in your eyes.

Before using hydroxychloroquine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have psoriasis, porphyria, liver disease, alcoholism, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency.

Call a poison control center at once and then seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of hydroxychloroquine can be fatal, especially in children.

Take hydroxychloroquine for the full prescribed length of time for malaria. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

When treating lupus or arthritis, tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 months of treatment.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use hydroxychloroquine if you are allergic to it.

Hydroxychloroquine should not be used for long-term treatment in children.

To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • a history of vision changes or damage to your retina caused by an anti-malaria medication;

  • heart disease, heart rhythm disorder (such as long QT syndrome);

  • diabetes;

  • a stomach disorder;

  • an allergy to quinine;

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • psoriasis;

  • alcoholism; or

  • a genetic enzyme disorder such as porphyria or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency.

It is not known whether hydroxychloroquine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Malaria is more likely to cause death in a pregnant woman. If you are pregnant, talk with your doctor about the risks of traveling to areas where malaria is common.

It is not known whether hydroxychloroquine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Hydroxychloroquine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take hydroxychloroquine?

Take hydroxychloroquine exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Hydroxychloroquine is sometimes given only once per week. Choose the same day each week to take this medicine if you are on a weekly dosing schedule.

Take hydroxychloroquine with a meal or a glass of milk.

To prevent malaria: Start taking the medicine 2 weeks before entering an area where malaria is common. Continue taking the medicine regularly during your stay and for at least 8 weeks after you leave the area.

To treat malaria: Hydroxychloroquine is usually given for 3 days, starting with one high dose followed by a smaller dose during the next 2 days in a row.

Take this medicine for the full prescribed length of time for malaria. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

Use protective clothing, insect repellents, and mosquito netting around your bed to further prevent mosquito bites that could cause malaria.

Call your doctor as soon as possible if you have been exposed to malaria, or if you have fever or other symptoms of illness during or after a stay in an area where malaria is common.

No medication is 100% effective in treating or preventing all types of malaria. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if you have fever, vomiting, or diarrhea during your treatment.

When treating lupus or arthritis, hydroxychloroquine is usually given daily for several weeks or months. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 months of treatment.

While using hydroxychloroquine, you may need frequent blood tests and vision exams.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

See also:

Hydroxychloroquine dosage information (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of hydroxychloroquine can be fatal, especially in children.

Hydroxychloroquine overdose must be treated quickly. You may be told to induce vomiting right away (at home, before transport to an emergency room). Ask the poison control center how to induce vomiting in the case of an overdose.

Overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, vision changes, slow heart rate, chest pain, severe dizziness, seizure (convulsions), or shallow breathing.

What should I avoid while taking hydroxychloroquine?

Avoid taking an antacid or Kaopectate (kaolin-pectin) within 4 hours before or after you take hydroxychloroquine. Some antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hydroxychloroquine.

Hydroxychloroquine side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to hydroxychloroquine: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Taking hydroxychloroquine long-term or at high doses may cause irreversible damage to the retina of your eye. Stop taking this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have trouble focusing, if you see light streaks or flashes in your vision, or if you notice any swelling or color changes in your eyes.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • headache with chest pain and severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats;

  • very slow heart rate, weak pulse;

  • muscle weakness, numbness or tingling;

  • low blood sugar¬†- headache, hunger, sweating, irritability, dizziness, nausea, fast heart rate, and feeling anxious or shaky; or

  • low blood cell counts¬†- fever, chills, sore throat, weakness or ill feeling, swollen gums, mouth sores, skin sores, rapid heart rate, pale skin, easy bruising, unusual bleeding, feeling light-headed.

Common hydroxychloroquine side effects may include:

  • headache, dizziness, ringing in your ears;

  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;

  • loss of appetite, weight loss;

  • mood changes, feeling nervous or irritable;

  • skin rash or itching; or

  • hair loss.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also:

Hydroxychloroquine side effects (in more detail)

Hydroxychloroquine dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria:

Treatment of the acute attack: 800 mg (620 mg base) followed in 6 to 8 hours by 400 mg (310 mg base), then 400 mg (310 mg base) once a day for 2 consecutive days; alternatively, a single dose of 800 mg (620 mg base) has also been effective

Dosage on the basis of body weight:
First dose: 10 mg base/kg (not to exceed 620 mg base)
Second dose: 5 mg base/kg (not to exceed 310 mg base) 6 hours after first dose
Third dose: 5 mg base/kg 18 hours after second dose
Fourth dose: 5 mg base/kg 24 hours after third dose

Each dose should be taken with a meal or a glass of milk.

Concomitant therapy with an 8-aminoquinoline drug is necessary for the radical cure of vivax and malariae malaria.

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria Prophylaxis:

Suppression: 400 mg (310 mg base) orally on the same day every week

Suppressive therapy should begin 2 weeks prior to exposure; however, failing this, an initial dose of 800 mg (620 mg base) may be taken in 2 divided doses (6 hours apart). Suppressive therapy should continue for 8 weeks after leaving the endemic area.

Each dose should be taken with a meal or a glass of milk.

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis:

Initial dose: 400 to 600 mg (310 to 465 mg base) orally once a day
Maintenance dose: 200 to 400 mg (155 to 310 mg base) orally once a day

Each dose should be taken with a meal or a glass of milk.

Usual Adult Dose for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus:

Discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus:
Initial dose: 400 mg (310 mg base) orally once or twice a day for several weeks or months, depending on patient response
Maintenance dose: 200 to 400 mg (155 to 310 mg base) orally once a day

Each dose should be taken with a meal or a glass of milk.

 

Hydroxychloroquine can cause serious liver or heart problems, especially if you use certain medicines at the same time, including:

  • other medicines to treat malaria;

  • an antibiotic or antifungal medicine;

  • antiviral medicine to treat hepatitis or HIV/AIDS;

  • antidepressants or antipsychotic medicines;

  • birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy;

  • cancer medication;

  • cholesterol-lowering medication;

  • heart or blood pressure medicine;

  • pain or arthritis medicines (including aspirin, Tylenol, Advil, and Aleve);

  • seizure medication;

  • stomach acid reducers; or

  • tuberculosis medicine.

This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with hydroxychloroquine. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide. Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with hydroxychloroquine. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

This is the best drug they gave me during my 2 weeks in the hospital for Covid 19.

I really don’t give a fuck what those talking heads have to say.

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14 minutes ago, Canton Dawg said:

This is the best drug they gave me during my 2 weeks in the hospital for Covid 19.

I really don’t give a fuck what those talking heads have to say.

Happy to hear you are out of the hospital. 

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1 hour ago, Canton Dawg said:

This is the best drug they gave me during my 2 weeks in the hospital for Covid 19.

I really don’t give a fuck what those talking heads have to say.

Amen.  Be careful expressing how grateful you are, a- holes like DHead would rather you had died from taking it.

glad your feeling better.ūüĎć

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2 hours ago, Canton Dawg said:

This is the best drug they gave me during my 2 weeks in the hospital for Covid 19.

I really don’t give a fuck what those talking heads have to say.

DUDE ! That is great news ! I was a bit concerned when you were quiet there for a bit.

Idiots hate the drug because the president they hate mentioned it. the hate knows no limits anymore.

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