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Favorite GAMEDAY food?..... Dine in, carryout, *delivery or make at home.

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Crispy Croutons homemade from Mr Food.... quick and easy to go with your favorite salad. (see previous page for a delicious Caesar salad recipe)

Crispy Croutons
MAKES    4 cups    COOK TIME 15   Min

Say goodbye to store-bought croutons and hello to lots of homemade crunch and flavor! These Crispy Croutons are sure to add that extra special something to your salads. And we love how versatile this recipe is! Use your favorite bread and your special brand of seasoning to make a homemade crouton that's all your own.

What You'll Need

  • 1/2 loaf French bread (see options)
  • 1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper

What to Do

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Place bread chunks in a medium bowl. Combine remaining ingredients in a small bowl.
  2. Lightly toss bread chunks with butter mixture and place on a large rimmed baking sheet; bake 15 to 20 minutes or until crispy and golden.
  3. Let cool then store in an airtight container until ready to use.

So Many Options!

  • You can use any type of bread, from white to rye with or without seeds, to make these Crispy Croutons. Also, if you'd prefer, you can use 4 tablespoons olive oil in place of the butter which cuts down on the calories a bit. Plus, to make these cheesy, just add 1 tablespoon of grated Parmesan cheese along with the other seasonings, and reduce the salt to 1/4 teaspoon.
     
  • Use these homemade croutons to top our Zesty Flank Steak Salad, our Italian BLT Bread Salad, or our Tossed Spinach Salad.
     
  • To tie it all together, try one of our Easy Homemade Salad Dressings!

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Croutons are croutons IMO...store bough work just fine.

 

 

 

I do make my own dressing most of the time.

 

 

I love the Columbia restaurant....Cuban food. Started in Tampa.  Here their famous 1905 salad.    It doesn't get any better.

 

https://www.columbiarestaurant.com/The-Columbia-Experience/Recipes/1905-Salad

 

 

 

The Columbia in St. Armands, Sarasota is one of my favorite restaurants anywhere.  Tampa, Clearwater, and St. Augustine are great.  Great food, service, and ambiance.  Cuban food rocks!

 

A cup of Spanish bean soup and a full 1905 salad is the best lunch in the history of lunch IMO.  Maybe a cup of the bean soup, half a salad and half a Cuban isn't far behind if you are hungry.

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2 hours ago, ballpeen said:

Croutons are croutons IMO...store bough work just fine.

I do make my own dressing most of the time.

I love the Columbia restaurant....Cuban food. Started in Tampa.  Here their famous 1905 salad.    It doesn't get any better.

https://www.columbiarestaurant.com/The-Columbia-Experience/Recipes/1905-Salad

..... edit add, nice lunch and dinner menus

 

Some things come down to convienence vs taste vs making it at home vs cost etc.  My wife would make her own croutons from time to time to use up a favorite bread and it came out pretty good.  Plus sometimes store bought croutons can be hard as bricks -and- homemade can be way cheaper.......if you want to do the work, the time is negligible especially if you're retired and in the kitchen anyway.

Most of the time we just grab several varieties off the shelf and move on  but we might try and make a few more now.  We also are eating more salad in our diet.  On the salad dressings same thing we occasionally have been making some but I've been on a try new bottled salad dressing kick.  I used to be creamy anything every time but the wife introduced me to vinagrettes and other things I'd never eat.

Today it's a spinach, tomatoes, red onions, basil, mozzeralla salad with a red wine vinagrette.......I'd NEVER try that years back now I love it.  I'm also eating healthier than ever and enjoying it.  Vinagrettes are easy to make.....if you want to bother.  Tomorrow a simple but delicious English cucumber salad with a homemade mayo and sour cream dressing, salt and pepper to taste.

On Cuban food it can be packed with flavor there's a little ma & pa restaurant about 6 miles away that specializes in that stuff.  I love their version of a pressed Montecristo sandwich better than any I've had anywhere plus great Cuban  salads and appetizers.   I love those places way better than the franchise joints......pizza included !  Too bad so many are going away especially now.

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got myself a Blackstone griddle grill Hot Damn its badass 

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6 hours ago, ATOM said:

got myself a Blackstone griddle grill Hot Damn its badass 

I really like those, but I already have my gas grill, smoker, propane turkey fryer & electric turkey fryer (for the larger birds). I have no more room!

Mike

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I prefer charcoal grilling on a weber kettle.  Might as well cook inside if your using anything else.

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Great we had red onions in salads Friday and Saturday and they were delicious !  But this might extend beyond just red onions to white and yellow.  From the FDA:. https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/outbreak-investigation-salmonella-newport-red-onions-july-2020

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella Newport: Red Onions (July 2020)

Do not eat, sell, or serve onions from Thomson International, Inc.

 
 

The FDA, along with CDC and state and local partners, is investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections. FDA’s traceback investigation is ongoing but has identified Thomson International, Inc. of Bakersfield, CA as a likely source of potentially contaminated red onions. Although the investigation has determined that red onions are the likely source of this outbreak, Thomson International, Inc. has notified FDA that it will be recalling all varieties of onions that could have come in contact with potentially contaminated red onions, due to the risk of cross-contamination. This recall would include red, white, yellow, and sweet onions from Thomson International, Inc. Recall information will be made public as soon as it is available from Thomson International, Inc.

The investigation is ongoing to determine the source of contamination and if additional products are linked to illness. Additional information will be provided as it becomes available.

Recommendations

Advice for consumers, restaurants, and retailers: Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not eat, sell, or serve red, white, yellow, or sweet onions from Thomson International, Inc. or products containing such onions. If you cannot tell if your onion is from Thomson International Inc., or your food product contains such onions, you should not eat, sell, or serve it, and should throw it out.

FDA recommends that anyone who received or suspects having received onions from Thomson International, Inc. use extra vigilance in cleaning and sanitizing any surfaces and containers that may have come in contact with these products to reduce the risk of cross-contamination. This includes cutting boards, slicers, countertops, refrigerators, and storage bins.

Consumers who have symptoms of Salmonella infection should contact their health care provider. Most people with salmonellosis develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal.

Suppliers and Distributors: Suppliers, distributors and others in the supply chain should not use, ship or sell red, white, yellow, or sweet onions from Thomson International, Inc. or food products containing such onions. Suppliers and distributors that re-package raw onions should use extra vigilance in cleaning any surfaces and storage areas that may have come into contact with onions from Thomson International, Inc. If there has been potential cross contamination or mixing of onions from other sources with onions from Thomson International, Inc., suppliers and distributors should discard all comingled and potentially cross-contaminated product........ continued.......

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GIANT EAGLE INCLUDED IN NATIONWIDE RECALL RELATED TO POTENTIAL SALMONELLA CONTAMINATION.

Onions sold at Pittsburgh-area Giant Eagle and Market District locations are included in a nationwide recall related to potential salmonella contamination.

Giant Eagle posted the alert about Thomson International and Onions52 brand products on its website Sunday.

Giant Eagle shoppers who have purchased onions included in the recall between now and early June may also have received an automated phone call alerting them to the recall.

The recall includes both bulk and bagged onions.

Customers are eligible to receive a refund if they bring a qualifying receipt to their local Giant Eagle or Market District. Any remaining onions should be thrown out, according to the Giant Eagle recall notice.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday announced the nationwide salmonella newport outbreak is linked to red onions from the Bakersfield, Calif.-based Thomson International, Inc.

White, yellow and sweet onions could also be contaminated.

Jamie Martines is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Jamie at 724-850-2867, jmartines@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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On 8/1/2020 at 7:40 PM, DieHardBrownsFan said:

I prefer charcoal grilling on a weber kettle.  Might as well cook inside if your using anything else.

I still have a Weber.  

 

Over the years I have had every kind of grill you can imagine.  Smokers, eggs, propane, blah blah.  It's big enough I can off set smoke a 4-5 rib rib roast, or a large chicken.  Not big enough for a turkey.  

 

Many times with say a rib roast, i will go heavy smoke for maybe 45 minutes, then take it in to finish off in the oven.  A whole lot easier and more control over things. To me, 80% of the smoke flavor comes in the first 40 minutes of the smoke.  That way you don't need to keep going out to add wood or coals, keep turning the darn thing to get a even roast.

 

For steaks, I am exclusively a in a hot cast iron skillet on the stove top to char, then roast in the oven until you reach the desired temp.  Burgers on the other hand, I have to cook them outside.

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On 8/1/2020 at 1:17 PM, ATOM said:

got myself a Blackstone griddle grill Hot Damn its badass 

Which one of the Blackstone grills did you get, they have a bunch of them.  And of course like everyone else they have a recipe page.   

https://blackstoneproducts.com

Screenshot_2020-08-03_110653.jpg

Screenshot_2020-08-03_110708.jpg

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UPDATE AUGUST 3, 2020 - GIANT EAGLE ONION RECALL

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (WKBN) – Giant Eagle is recalling some onion products over concerns that they may contain salmonella.

Some bulk and bagged Spanish onions, white onions and red onions are being recalled.

The PC/PLU/NDC numbers are 4093, 4663, 3286 and 4082.

Customers who have purchased the affected products since June 6 and still have them should throw them away. You can also bring a receipt to a local store of a refund.

For questions, customers may contact Onions52 customer service desk at (801) 773-0630 Monday – Friday MST, or by email customerservice@onions52.com.

Onions are part of a nationwide recall impacting a California distributor.

Thomson International Inc. of Bakersfield, California is recalling Red, Yellow, White, and Sweet Yellow Onions shipped from May 1, 2020 through the present.  The onions are being recalled because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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On 8/1/2020 at 1:17 PM, ATOM said:

got myself a Blackstone griddle grill Hot Damn its badass 

Looks big enough to cook for a troop of boy scouts.  Boy scouts are at the age where they can chow down.

 

There was a time I could have used that, but with only the wife and I, we don't need anything that big.  Griddles are under rated.  Like I said, I only cook steaks in a cast iron pan on the stove, then finish in the oven.  Way more control.

 

You don't cook them over coals long enough to really get much charcoal flavor or smoke flavor to make it worth the hassle of firing up the grill,  plus here in the south it is hot 9 months of the year.  I don't like standing over a hot grill tending meat.  I guess it saves me some money.  Rather than salting the meat I can just drip sweat on it....lol.

 

Get a couple of good cast irons...I have a 8" and a 16".  Season them up properly, you have non stick....and they get better over time.  I have had mine for years.  I might dump grills and various kitchen items, but I'll never get rid of my cast irons.  The 8" was my grandmothers.  My sister gave it to me when she got all of granny's cast iron.  It has maybe 110 years of meals cooked in to the thing.  It's perfect for 2 filets and a few mushroom or some onions.   Cast iron holds flavor.  A bit of every meal ever cooked stays in that thing. 

 

My 16" I bought.  It only has about 40 years of meals cooked in.....it's getting there...lol   I needed bigger once the children started to drop in to the picture.  I couldn't cook enough steak, bacon, or scramble enough eggs to serve everybody at once.   Mostly, I am the cook in the house.  I love cooking.

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2 hours ago, ballpeen said:

Looks big enough to cook for a troop of boy scouts.  Boy scouts are at the age where they can chow down.

There was a time I could have used that, but with only the wife and I, we don't need anything that big.  Griddles are under rated.  Like I said, I only cook steaks in a cast iron pan on the stove, then finish in the oven.  Way more control.

You don't cook them over coals long enough to really get much charcoal flavor or smoke flavor to make it worth the hassle of firing up the grill,  plus here in the south it is hot 9 months of the year.  I don't like standing over a hot grill tending meat.  I guess it saves me some money.  Rather than salting the meat I can just drip sweat on it....lol.

Get a couple of good cast irons...I have a 8" and a 16".  Season them up properly, you have non stick....and they get better over time.  I have had mine for years.  I might dump grills and various kitchen items, but I'll never get rid of my cast irons.  The 8" was my grandmothers.  My sister gave it to me when she got all of granny's cast iron.  It has maybe 100 years of meals cooked in to the thing.  It's perfect for 2 filets and a few mushroom or some onions.   Cast iron holds flavor.  A bit of every meal ever cooked stays in that thing.

My 16" I bought.  It only has about 40 years of meals cooked in.....it's getting there...lol   I needed bigger once the children started to drop in to the picture.  I couldn't cook enough steak, bacon, or scramble enough eggs to serve everybody at once.   Mostly, I am the cook in the house.  I love cooking.

Back when I was in scouts a couple of camp sites we visited used big wood stoves plus we had big lots of cast irons.  We'd cook for 30-40 scouts and leaders in all seasons I loved it !  Our troop leader had a deal with A&P to get bulk food like eggs, bread, butter, meat you name it !  And we ate like horses.

I'll never forget cooking a complete Thanksgiving dinner with wood stoves which had ovens and well water and it snowed.  Even breakfast was great bacon, eggs, trail bread the works.

And my little Ol' grandmother used cast iron all the time and she was the best cook I've ever known.

Now I love steak, burgers, veggies and more on our grill but griddle grills have their place.

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I know.  I was a Eagle Scout.  Some of the best meals I ever had were in camp, cooked by some troop leader or some dad there to help out. 

 

The reality is they probably weren't all that good,  but home fries with onions and sausage, and eggs with cheese just seemed to taste better in camp.

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SAN MARZANO PIZZA

Prep Time  20 Min    Cook Time 20 Min    Serves 4

Our classic San Marzano pizza recipe, made with our Cento Certified San Marzano Tomatoes, fresh mozzarella and basil.

★ For this and other Centro pizza recipes see. https://www.cento.com/recipes-categories/pizza.php

Ingredients

Directions

Preheat oven to 400˚F. Prepare pizza dough according to Chef Cento’s Pizza Dough recipe. Roll out dough to desired size and thickness, then transfer to a pizza pan, stone or screen. 

Season the San Marzano tomatoes with salt and pepper, then spread evenly over the dough. Evenly distribute mozzarella and garnish with fresh basil leaves.

 Drizzle with olive oil and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until pizza is cooked as desired. Serves 4.

A good Italian style pizza for a GAMEDAY  or anyday !

 

san_marzano_pizza.jpg

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Cento, San Marzano are the best.  At least for a canned tomato.  Even fresh are hard to beat them unless you are just wanting to eat some fresh sliced tomatoes alone or on a burger.  For cooking up a sauce, they are the only way, IMO.

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4 hours ago, ballpeen said:

Cento, San Marzano are the best.  At least for a canned tomato.  Even fresh are hard to beat them unless you are just wanting to eat some fresh sliced tomatoes alone or on a burger.  For cooking up a sauce, they are the only way, IMO.

I haven't had much luck growing San Marzano - never heard of Cento, but Amish Paste are pretty good, and big.

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8 hours ago, calfoxwc said:

I haven't had much luck growing San Marzano - never heard of Cento, but Amish Paste are pretty good, and big.

They are canned tomatoes....imported from Italy.  Cento is the brand.  Comes in a yellow can.  You have them in the local grocery store.  Give them a try.  Like I said, they are saucing tomatoes.  You aren't going to slice or dice to put on a sandwich or in a salad.  I guess you could, but I'll take fresh for that.  There is already some sauce in the can, but there are 4-5 whole tomatoes in the can.

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4 hours ago, ballpeen said:

They are canned tomatoes....imported from Italy.  Cento is the brand.  Comes in a yellow can.  You have them in the local grocery store.  Give them a try.  Like I said, they are saucing tomatoes.  You aren't going to slice or dice to put on a sandwich or in a salad.  I guess you could, but I'll take fresh for that.  There is already some sauce in the can, but there are 4-5 whole tomatoes in the can.

Cento San Marzano are branded and only grown in Italy and traceable there to prevent counterfeiting.  In the USA and elsewhere they are commonly known  and grown as roma tomatoes.....favored by my dad and my wife, great for sauces and canning.  For more on Cento tomatoes see https://www.cento.com/index.php

The tomatoes themselves:

Origins

San Marzano tomatoes originate from the small town of San Marzano sul Sarno, near Naples, Italy, and were first grown in volcanic soil in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius. One story goes that the first seed of this tomato came to Campania in 1770, as a gift from the Viceroyalty of Peru to the Kingdom of Naples, and that it was planted in the area of San Marzano sul Sarno.

In the United States, San Marzano tomatoes are the genetic base for another popular paste tomato, the Roma tomato. The Roma is a cross between a San Marzano and two other varieties (one of which was also a San Marzano hybrid) and was introduced by the USDA's Agricultural Research Service in 1955.........

Yes there are many differences and varieties of 🍅 tomatoes.  Bon appetit !

  (And yes I love tomatoes, at the old homestead we grew many varieties, my grandfather and dad used to collect and propogate the seeds from tomatoes and other plants.  My grandfather was also an expert grafter from the Ukraine. We had 10 different kinds of fruit trees on our property. Oh the stuff that you learn here!)

Edited by mjp28
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One of my favorites PHILLY CHEESESTEAK SANDWICHES  Philly style but which one is the best ? From Mr Food and also see the notes below.  Perfect for a GAMEDAY or anyday hearty meal.   
Philly Cheese Steak Sandwiches
 
SERVES   4    COOK TIME    20 Min

Our Philly Cheese Steak Sandwiches is the closest you can get to "the real thing" without taking a trip to the city! This traditional recipe is melt-in-your mouth delicious and takes just 10 minutes to make. All you need to do is heat up your tasty ingredients in a skillet before creating your sandwich. Our secret ingredient? Cheez wiz! It might sound strange, but this combo is absolutely delicious.

What You'll Need

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 pounds beef top round, thinly sliced (see Note)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 4 hoagie rolls, split
  • 1 cup Cheez Whiz, melted (or Velveeta or provolone or other cheese see Notes below)

What to Do

  1. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil until hot. Add onions, and saute 6 to 8 minutes, or until onions are tender. Transfer to a bowl and set aside.
  2. Add beef to skillet and sprinkle with salt and black pepper; saute 3 to 5 minutes, or until no pink remains in beef. Transfer to a cutting board and cut steak into very thin strips, almost shaved. 
  3. Place steak on hoagie rolls, top with onions and drizzle with melted cheese, serve Philly Cheese Steak Sandwiches immediately.

---> Notes...I always liked mine best with chipped steak, melted provolone, onions on a soft Italian sandwich bun, ummmmm !    :P

  • -------> The easiest way to get thinly sliced beef top round is to ask the butcher at the supermarket to do it for you.
  • Not a fan of Cheez Wiz? Some people prefer to make these Philly Cheesesteak Sandwiches with Velveetva Cheese instead.
  • If you love the taste of a cheese steak sandwich but are looking for something new and exciting, try our Cheese Steak Casserole, Philly Cheese Steak Bake, or Philly Cheese Steak Omelet Cups!
 
-----> * Did You Know? The Philly Cheese Steak is one of the most debated sandwiches in the U.S.! Not only do folks get pretty heated about who makes the best Philly Cheese Steaks in Philadelphia, but there is also a lot of debate about what ingredients go into an authentic cheesesteak. For example, in the case of the cheese, some like theirs with American or provolone, while others believe that a truly authentic sandwich should be made with Cheez Whiz. Then, there's the bread - it's pretty agreed upon that it should never be toasted. And when it comes to add-ons, that's a whole other discussion! Common toppings include onions, peppers, and mushrooms. No matter where you stand on this debate, we hope you'll give our version a try (and tweak to your liking!) as we know you're going to love them!

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