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calfoxwc

The Stupendous Crisis Survival Thread

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One time, at my Mom's old home place up on Fayette Mnt, WV, my cousin and I, about the third grade?..were sitting in their corn crib in some shade, flicking pieces of dried corn to the other side. All of a sudden, a big mouse ran across the corn in between us at high speed. We laughed and then wondered what he was running from. We got the heck out of there, my Dad borrowed Grannie's rifle and shot it - a big copperhead was about 7 feet from where we had been sitting.

   But sure, some of these are creatures let go by morons. An alligator is obvious - but not so much a rattlesnake - the are known to be in SW ohio, along with a few? wild boars. Wild animals travel, like the mountain lion that one night just 9 miles out of Cambridge.

  Our neighbord was telling me three coyotes ran in our field past him as he hid behind his bee hives, and that he also saw a bobcat.

  The outdoors can be unpredictable.

So, last night we went to Lowe's, and I came across a tactical flashlight - 700 lumens. My other two are 320. For 22 bucks on sale.

Lit up the back yard last night, and near our house was a big skunk. Time to do some night hunting.

If Tex wasn't so far away, I'd invite him out to do some groundhog skeet.

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17 minutes ago, TexasAg1969 said:

WV is part of their territory as is most of Ohio if I read this copperhead distribution map right.

Agkistrodon contortrix range.png

There are only three venomous, or poisonous, snakes in Ohio. These are the Eastern timber rattlesnake, northern copperhead, and the massasauga rattlesnake. Every year people claim to see the dangerous water moccasin, also known as cottonmouth, in Ohio's waters.

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20 minutes ago, DieHardBrownsFan said:

There are only three venomous, or poisonous, snakes in Ohio. These are the Eastern timber rattlesnake, northern copperhead, and the massasauga rattlesnake. Every year people claim to see the dangerous water moccasin, also known as cottonmouth, in Ohio's waters.

I can't believe cottonmouths could last up here in the cold. I know that when a buddy and I went wading for frogs out in a swamp on the back of WP AFB, we heard to watch out for the small massasauga rattler. Never saw any, though. I know there are copperheads in Oh, but the Timber rattler thing just shocks me.

  I'm really starting to wonder what the hell is actually out in our 2 acre wetlands area out back. Here in town, I found this last year:

milksnake1.jpgit was a harmless milk snake. I was wondering if it would grow up to be a boa constrictor or something lol. But Fish and Wildlife expert looked at the pic I sent, and she said it was a milk snake for sure. So, I let it go in our woods.

Check this out:

http://oplin.org/snake/fact pages/rattlesnake_e_mass/rattlesnake_e_mass.html

massasauga.jpg

Sure, I knew the little (milk) snake I caught didn't have rattles. But the second pic is a Massasauga rattlesnake.

Egad. Mebbe I need snake boots when I go out to explore the wetlands out back when it dries up......

 

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2 hours ago, calfoxwc said:

Lit up the back yard last night, and near our house was a big skunk. Time to do some night hunting.

If Tex wasn't so far away, I'd invite him out to do some groundhog skeet.

Two things. My daughter called me up about 2 months ago asking me to come get the kids some clothes from her they had just washed and take them to school. The two dogs they have had discovered a skunk, got sprayed and then stunk up the whole house. They were trying to clean up the dogs with remedies found on the internet and opening the doors & windows the house to get the smell out. Shortly after the kids went to school the school called asking them to bring them cleaner clothes because they smelled like skunks. Eventually they had pest control come out with "live" traps to catch them and relocate them. They also had to spray the yard because apparently skunks leave a scent to tell other skunks that this is a safe place to live. Never knew that.

Second, how do you catch those little groundhogs anyway. I've heard of long range prairie dog plinkin', but not groundhog tossing for skeet practice. Do you use a shotgun or is it more sporting to use a 22?😂

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I went to throw away some garbage one morning outside in the blue container the city provided.  It was still pitch black outside.  Open the lid and this big azz raccoon jumps out growling.  Scared the Shi t out of me!😂

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2 hours ago, DieHardBrownsFan said:

I went to throw away some garbage one morning outside in the blue container the city provided.  It was still pitch black outside.  Open the lid and this big azz raccoon jumps out growling.  Scared the Shi t out of me!😂

I was out hunting armadillos one night with that 20 gauge and a headlamp spotlight when a possum got curious about the light and walked right up to me before hissing real loud. I never knew they had so many sharp looking teeth and that raised the hair up on me real fast before he ran off the other way. I really didn't want to shoot him. I was gettin' after the dillos so they would stop tearing up Granny's flower beds.

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5 hours ago, TexasAg1969 said:

Second, how do you catch those little groundhogs anyway. I've heard of long range prairie dog plinkin', but not groundhog tossing for skeet practice. Do you use a shotgun or is it more sporting to use a 22?😂

Well, you don't catch em, you dig out their hole aways, then reach down in to the end of their hole, and you drag em out of the hole, and then throw em up into the air, and I get to shoot em with my 12 gauge. You good to try it?😎

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2 hours ago, calfoxwc said:

Well, you don't catch em, you dig out their hole aways, then reach down in to the end of their hole, and you drag em out of the hole, and then throw em up into the air, and I get to shoot em with my 12 gauge. You good to try it?😎

Can a rabies shot in advance stop rabies if one of those little devils takes a bite?🐗

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I highly doubt that Cal sticks his hand in the hole and drags them out and throws them.  I seen ground hogs in the city twice as big as a cat.

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heck, no. groundhogs can really be vicious. I'll give Tex some gloves. I have to be the skeet shooter.

I just need a big dumm...I mean, a good brave liberal to feel good about it and be my groundhog slingshot

 

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25 minutes ago, calfoxwc said:

heck, no. groundhogs can really be vicious. I'll give Tex some gloves. I have to be the skeet shooter.

I just need a big dumm...I mean, a good brave liberal to feel good about it and be my groundhog slingshot

 

I tell you the one about the 3 Aggies that went deer hunting? They leased a place to hunt and when the owner dropped each one in turn to fairly close deer stands he told them no matter what don't go off trying to track some of his bigger bucks through the high brush across the front. Sure enough one Aggie spotted a likely Boone & Crockett trophy buck, but it went to his left into some brush. So he got down and went after it and of course, "boom, boom" and down he went. The other two Aggies rushed him to the hospital and a couple of hours later the surgeon walks out shaking his head. They rushed to his side to inquire whether their friend was gonna make it or not. The surgeon said to them, "Well judging from the entrance and exit wounds it looks like he had a really good chance..................................................................if only you boys hadn't field dressed him before you brought him in."    😜🦌

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Well after researching a lot I may have to go for a bolt action Marlin XT-22RO LR Black synthetic stock which comes with an already mounted 3-9 X 32 variable scope for $205 plus tax. I had thought maybe the Savage Mark IIF 22LR, but adding scope, rings and rail would have cost more for a similarly accurate rifle. And I already know I can open up the stock to store extra survival "goodies" like the video I posted. Plus the barrel is 1 inch longer than the Mark II.

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On 11/2/2018 at 10:56 PM, TexasAg1969 said:

I tell you the one about the 3 Aggies that went deer hunting?🦌

Speaking of which I damn near got me a real trophy buck yesterday. Biggest I have ever seen for a whitetail. This guy was as big as a full grown muscular muledeer and a rack that had to be up there in the record books. Fortunately I was able to slam on the breaks as he darted full speed out of the dark across on the road in front of me and I was just barely able to get around behind him on the paved shoulder without flipping my wife's Outback. If he'd a wrecked the car I was damn sure taking the head to a taxidermist so I could brag to friends that "I just happened to have my 9mm pistol on my hip that day boys". 🤠 It would have been true, but just not the whole truth.🤩

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3 hours ago, DieHardBrownsFan said:

An Outback?  You're definetly a liberal.

LOL! That is the official car for the mountains of Colorado. When I told my Republican sister I was getting one last spring she told me hers was coming in the following week (lives in Colorado). Smart sister. Those things are fantastic in heavy snow.

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so, just read a neat article about pine. Learn something every day.

Pine needles are diuretic and contain both vitamins A and C.My kindergarten school picture is the first documented evidence of my lifelong love affair with trees, and with pine in particular. My dad once planted a little grove of white pine trees (Pinus strobus) in our backyard. I spent my afternoons playing in their whorled branches, unwittingly collecting resin in my locks while leaning my head against their sturdy trunks. My mom cut out the sticky parts, resulting in a hairstyle that could only be rivaled by the likes of Pippi Longstocking.

There are more than 100 pine species worldwide, and most have recorded medicinal uses. Cultures around the globe have used the needles, inner bark, and resin to treat various ailments. Internally, pine is a traditional remedy for coughs, colds, allergies, and even urinary tract infections. Topically, pine is used to address skin infections and to lessen joint inflammation in arthritic conditions.

Along with its myriad medicinal applications, pine is a source of lumber, food, essential oil, and incense. A few species of pine in North America and a handful in Eurasia yield the familiar edible pine nuts. Pine is indispensable commercially for its lumber and its pulp, which is used to make paper and related products. Many species of pine are considered cornerstone species, playing a central role in their ecological community. Finally, many species are planted ornamentally for their evergreen foliage and winter beauty.
Medicinal Use of Pines

Pine needles: Fresh pine needles and buds, picked in springtime, are sometimes referred to as “pine tops.” These needles are diuretic and contain both vitamins A and C. When boiled in water, the resulting tea can be consumed to treat fevers, coughs, and colds. Pine needle tea is one of the most important historical medicines of the southeastern United States, especially given pines’ abundance in the region. Renowned Alabama herbalist Tommie Bass reported that “the country people used to drink pine top tea every spring and fall to prevent colds.” Bass also used the needles in a steam inhalation to break up tenacious phlegm in the lungs. I combine pine needles with sprigs of fresh thyme (Thymus spp.) and bee balm (Monarda spp.) for this purpose.I enjoy the needles — fresh or dry — as a fragrant and warming wintertime tea. They pair well with cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum verum) and cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum). Pine offers relief in sinus and lung congestion through its stimulating expectorant, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory qualities.

Pine bark: The inner bark of the pine tree contains more resin and is more astringent than the needles. Historically, it has been used as an antimicrobial poultice and infused in bathwater for muscle aches and pains. It’s also commonly boiled in water and ingested as a remedy for coughs and colds. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the knotty wood from several species of pine is infused in wine and used for joint pain. I try to reserve the bark for topical applications, since the needles are easy to harvest and more pleasant in taste.

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of course, you always have to research for WHICH plants/leaves/pines to use...

" Most pine trees are safe to make pine needle tea. Some varieties of them are poisonous though, like Yew (Taxus), Norfolk Island Pine (Araucana heterophylla) and Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa). So check the variety carefully before picking up any needles. "

I'll be using white pines.

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ou can drink it every day or every other day. Avoid drinking too much, however, as it contains 4 to 5 times more vitamin C than orange juice as well as a high amount of vitamin A. Remember, too much of a good thing, including vitamins, can quickly become a bad thing.

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ok, made pine tea. Pretty good, in a strange way, with a tsp of sugar.... not bad at all.

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14 hours ago, calfoxwc said:

ok, made pine tea. Pretty good, in a strange way, with a tsp of sugar.... not bad at all.

I grew up in Pine tree country (Beaumont, Texas) with multiple pines all around, especially the second house we lived in. They had built the housing area in a former pine forest and left most of the really big ones in place as best they could. However during Hurricane Audrey in 1957, the sound of many of those things whomping the ground when the winds pushed them down was terrifying. But all that said, there is nothing like going into the piney woods of east Texas and just breathing it in. I love the smell of a pine forest. I hope heaven smells that way when I finally get "home".

Oh BTW-here's a really good commemorative rifle from Henry----American made all the way. But it will set you back $903 + tax at my local gun store. I'd rather buy about 2 or 3 other 22LR's instead, but I must admit it's tempting to get that one or the military service commemorative. Problem is I'd probable display them in the library and never shoot 'em.  LOL! 🤩

https://www.henryusa.com/rifles/second-amendment-tribute-edition/

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I really want to own a Henry one of these days.

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2 hours ago, calfoxwc said:

I really want to own a Henry one of these days.

Yep me too cal. I'm seriously giving it consideration for my next savings project because again, it is an ambidextrous rifle so I can easily teach my grandson on it just like the Ruger pistol. The lever action is easy from both sides and the safety is built into the exterior trigger of the rifle by just pulling it back a short distance until it clicks. Trigger can't then be pulled nor can a blow discharge it.  Or just don't lever a round into it until you're ready to shoot. 

I like the Henrys with the octagon barrels. Kind of a throwback that makes them special over others out there. My dad taught me to shoot on my great uncle's old Remington Model 12 octagon barrelled pump action. My uncle had a drawer full of shorts, longs and long rifles of all different brands and I'd just grab a pocketfull and head out to shoot mostly small logs out near the barn. Great times and the kind of which I want my grandson to recall when he gets my age shooting what I leave for him.

BTW those things have a lifetime warranty. Can't beat that these days. The CEO encourages direct email contact with him should anything leave you dissatisfied in any way. I think I will email him and ask if I can pass that "lifetime" guarantee on to my grandson since at 71+ my guarantee will be very time limited.  LOL!

 

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On 11/15/2018 at 3:10 PM, calfoxwc said:

I really want to own a Henry one of these days.

Academy Sports & Outdoors is selling the Henry Golden Boy 22LR with the Octagon barrel for almost the same price I can find the regular Henry Octagon anywhere else. They tell me it's been their everyday price for some time now and it's around $5o less than I have found it anywhere else. Yep, my next savings project starts today with my weekly allowance. Just paid off a 4 X scope for the pistol. Squirrels would be more sporting with that if I ate 'em (which I never have cause rodent seems less appealing than Vietnamese dog was🐕😋). 

Should have enough for the rifle by early spring when the weather turns good.👍

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recall on the Walther PPS m2, btw.

****************************

Important Safety Recall
NOVEMBER 2018 Walther PPS M2 Pistols


Walther Arms, Inc. has recently discovered a potential safety issue with certain PPS M2 pistols. Walther is voluntarily initiating a recall to protect the safety of its customers because under certain conditions it is possible that some of these pistols may fire when dropped.


Please do not load or fire your Walther PPS M2 pistol and contact us immediately to arrange to have your pistol upgraded free of charge.


AN3020 - AN9999
AO0000 - AO9999
AP0000 - AP9999
AQ0000 - AQ9999
AR0000 - AR9999
AS0000 - AS9999
AT0000 - AT9999
AU0000 - AU7502


If your Serial Number is not listed above it is NOT affected by the Recall.

Link to Official PPS M2 Recall Page: https://www.waltherarms.com/recall

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We watched a show about a hiker that got lost on the Appalachian Trail. Found in her sleeping bag two years later. I went and found the article - really tragic. Some people hike, run out of water, and leave the trail to try to find a creek, or maybe a lake they see in the far distance. But distance can be badly deceiving. Then you get too exhausted to keep trying for that lake, try to get back to the trail, and can't find the trail.

   Or you are fishing, your motor stalls, won't run. A huge storm's wind takes you far to the other side of a large wilderness lake.

You don't know how to start a fire, make shelter, purify water, and have no food with you. Not knowing how to keep warm on a suddenly chilly night, could be fatal.

   When I was kid, there was a story about two hunters hunting some big public lands in the winter. The one hunter broke his leg in a fall, and hurt his back. Big snow country - the other hunter was sent to go get help. No survival equipment - the hunter that was hurt was hopelessly leaned up against a tree. The other hunter followed their tracks a long, long hike back to the truck - kept calling for help on his cb, help got here. But by the time they got back to the first hunter, he had died from exposure.

   I always greatly appreciated Dad teaching me so much about the outdoors all those years.

So, it isn't just "silly stuff" about apocalypses, it could be a hike in a national park, a car breakdown way out in the middle of nowhere, a wrong turn in a fishing boat - going back to camp when you can't find it could be an overnight stay somewhere.

  I think I'll look for some new different books on the subject, to add to my library.

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/27/us/missing-hiker-geraldine-largay-appalachian-trail-maine.html

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I did part of the Appalachian trail years ago.  I'd like to do the entire thing.  I don't see how anyone with knowledge could get lost.  But, someone without knowledge could.

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13 hours ago, calfoxwc said:

So, it isn't just "silly stuff" about apocalypses, it could be a hike in a national park, a car breakdown way out in the middle of nowhere, a wrong turn in a fishing boat - going back to camp when you can't find it could be an overnight stay somewhere.

Anytime I hike the wilderness I never count on anyone finding me should something happen. I carry enough survival gear, water, protection from rain & overnight cold (it gets cold at night in RMNP even in August) and a stout walking stick that can be easily converted into a splint with cord to tie it on should I break a leg. I also carry the bear horn which can double as an S.O.S. Additionally real outdoorsmen understand that 3 shots fired one or two seconds apart about every 10 minutes or so is a signal someone is in trouble, so I carry plenty of extra rounds for that purpose. Colorado is a bigtime hunting area for deer and elk and most hunters understand that signal. A good topographical map and a compass are an added plus to take along. The compass at a minimum. I do all this even though I have never been lost or even unsure of N-S-E-W. Sense of direction is somehow built into my head and I've never been able to explain it. I just use a compass to confirm it now and again. And if my wife comes along even for short hikes I use her sense of direction which is always 180 degrees off. It's like having a south pole aimed compass. (She won't deny this-she knows it's absolutely true).🌐🗺️🤩 

https://www.hunter-ed.com/michigan/studyGuide/Signaling-for-Help/20102301_700169559/

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And here is a great teaching tool on what NOT to do when shooting. Have a laugh!!🤣 I especially laughed at the guy with the scope too close to his head. You can see it coming for a good 10 seconds, but he sure couldn't. Dummie!😢

 

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