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Josh McDaniels

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Here ya go...Read it and weep

Timeline

Below is a timeline detailing the misguided actions of Josh McDaniels that led to the launch of www.joshmcdanielssucks.com:

January 2009:

• After signing a 4 year contract worth a reported $11.9M, Josh McDaniels is introduced by Pat Bowlen as the 12th head coach in the history of the Denver Broncos. McDaniels delivers a nervous and ragged performance at the introductory press conference, a sharp contrast to the polish and confidence of former Broncos’ head coach and executive vice president of football operations, Mike Shanahan.

• The hiring of McDaniels, only 33 years old at the time, is met with mixed reviews by NFL analysts and Denver fans. Many pundits and fans believe the Broncos should have hired a coach in his forties with 10 plus years of coaching experience (e.g. Jim Schwartz, Leslie Frazier, or Rex Ryan), or a coach that had previously served as an NFL head coach (e.g. Bill Cowher).

• Despite inheriting a team ranked 2nd in the NFL in total offense in 2008, McDaniels fires all of Denver’s offensive assistant coaches except running backs coach, Bobby Turner, and offensive line coach, Rick Dennison. McDaniels’ decision to fire quarterbacks coach, Jeremy Bates, particularly irks quarterback Jay Cutler who had passed for 4,526 yards and 25 touchdowns and made the Pro Bowl with Bates as his position coach in 2008.

February 2009:

• McDaniels attempts to trade Cutler and acquire New England quarterback, Matt Cassel, in 3 team deal that would have sent Cutler to Tampa Bay. McDaniels fails to complete the trade and Cassel is traded to AFC West rival, Kansas City. Cutler says he is not bothered by the trade proposal itself but by how he felt McDaniels misled him. McDaniels responded by offering that the Broncos merely listened to offers submitted from other teams, as they do for all players, but Cutler’s camp never buys such explanation.

• McDaniels convinces Pat Bowlen to fire general manager Jim Goodman and co-assistant general manager Jeff Goodman and promote 38 year old Brian Xanders from co-assistant general manager to general manager. It is clear McDaniels lied at his introductory press conference when he said that he looked forward to working with Jim Goodman, and that the elder Goodman would have the final say in all personnel matters.

• As free agency begins, the Denver Broncos sign veteran New England long snapper, Lonie Paxton, to a 5 year, $5.5M contract that includes a $1M signing bonus. The deal makes Paxton the 2nd highest paid long snapper in the NFL, slightly behind Cleveland’s Ryan Pontbriand, and results in the release of Broncos long snapper Mike Leach. Leach, who spent 7 seasons in Denver, was extremely popular with teammates and his release is harshly criticized by widely respected wide receiver Brandon Stokley.

March 2009:

• McDaniels continues to add former Patriots as the Broncos ink free agent wide receiver Jabar Gaffney. Prior to the start of the regular season, Denver signs or trades for 4 additional former New England players, Brandon Gorin, Russ Hochstein, LaMont Jordan, and LeKevin Smith, bringing the total number of former Patriots added to the Broncos by McDaniels to 6. Of the 6 players, only Jabar Gaffney and Lonie Paxton make worthwile contributions to the team during the 2009 season (Hochstein replaced incumbent Ben Hamilton at left guard in November but his play was less than average).

• The Broncos are major players in free agency, signing more than a dozen players, including safeties Brian Dawkins and Renaldo Hill, cornerback Andre Goodman, and linebacker Andra Davis. All of the players listed above play a major role in the significant improvement of Denver’s defense under McDaniels and defensive coordinator Mike Nolan.

• A conference call involving McDaniels, Pat Bowlen, Jay Cutler and Cutler’s agent, Bus Cook, fails to resolve the issues between Cutler and McDaniels. Subsequent to the meeting, Cutler tells ESPN.com ”I went in there with every intention of solving the issue, being a Bronco, moving forward as a Bronco. We weren’t in there but about 20 minutes, [McDaniels] did most of the talking, and as far as I’m concerned, he made it clear he wants his own guy. At the end of the meeting, he wasn’t like, ‘Jay, I want you as our quarterback, you’re our guy.’ It felt like the opposite… really, I figured we’d hash things out, shake hands, laugh a little and move forward. What happened was the last thing I expected.”

• On March 15, 2009, Broncos fans around the globe cringe as Pro Bowl quarterback Jay Cutler formally asks for a trade.

• McDaniels is blasted by many members of the media for his arrogance and stubbornness, including Denver Post columnists Woody Paige, who pleads to the Broncos “Don’t destroy franchise [by trading Cutler],” and Dave Krieger, who asks “[w]hich is easier to replace, a 25-year-old Pro Bowl quarterback or a 32-year-old rookie coach?”

April 2009:

• On April 2, 2009, the Broncos trade Cutler and a 2009 5th round draft pick to the Chicago Bears for quarterback Kyle Orton, 1st and 3rd round picks in 2009 and a 1st round pick in 2010.

• Two days after the trade of Cutler, Pat Bowlen writes a letter to fans in support of McDaniels. The mere fact that Bowlen believes it necessary to author such a letter demonstrates that he fears this trade could be one of the biggest missteps in the history of the franchise, if not the league.

• Mel Kiper grades McDaniels’ initial draft class as a “C.” The general consensus of Kiper and other draft experts is that though the Broncos were not in need of a running back, Knowshon Moreno (12th overall) will be a productive player for the Broncos, and outside linebacker Robert Ayers (18th overall) has Pro Bowl ability. However, McDaniels is universally condemned for trading (i) Denver’s 2010 1st round pick to Seattle to select diminutive Wake Forest cornerback Alphonso Smith in the 2nd round (37th overall), and (ii) Denver’s 3rd round pick (79th overall) and the 3rd round pick (84th overall) Denver received in the Cutler trade from Chicago to Pittsburgh to select one-dimensional, blocking tight end Richard Quinn in the 2nd round (64th overall). Denver also received Pittsburgh’s 4th round pick (132nd overall) in the latter deal, which it used to select Iowa guard Seth Olsen. Moreno rushes for 947 yards and 7 scores and adds 28 receptions for 213 yards and 2 touchdowns, but averages less than 4 yards per carry and fails to make a run longer than 36 yards in his rookie season. Ayers plays in 15 games and records 19 tackles and no sacks. Smith, Quinn and Olsen do not make significant contributions in 2009.

Rick Reilly of ESPN wonders “how arrogant can Josh McDaniels be?” and proclaims “Broncos fans, you’re screwed!” after McDaniels boasts that his draft board had fewer than 100 names on it despite 256 players being drafted.

June 2009:

• McDaniels names Kyle Orton starting quarterback, and characterizes the player as a “winner.” It is apparent that Orton’s win-loss record is over-hyped to cover for his shortcomings. He finishes the 2009 season 2-8 over the last 10 games, and his career record stands at 19-14 after his rookie season. The post-2005 record of Orton is important to note as Chicago’s defense and special teams were largely responsible for all of the 10 wins Orton was credited for in 2005 (i.e. without the benefit of a dominant defense (the Bears defense led the NFL in points against and yards allowed in 2005), Orton’s dreadful ’05 statistics (15 starts, 51.6% completion percentage, 1,869 yards passing, 9 touchdowns, and 13 interceptions) would not have translated into many wins).

August 2009:

• After being booed by fans at Mile High for throwing 2 interceptions during a scrimmage a week earlier, Kyle Orton, McDaniels’ hand picked successor to Cutler, throws interceptions on 3 consecutive drives to open the preseason at San Francisco.

• McDaniels suspends Pro Bowl wide receiver Brandon Marshall for “conduct detrimental to the team” after video of Marshall loafing it in practice surfaces on the internet. Marshall wants a new contract though 1 year remains on the term of the agreement he signed prior to his rookie season.

September 2009:

• After being held scoreless for almost 4 quarters, the Broncos beat Cincinnati on kickoff weekend thanks to an 87 yard tipped hail-marry touchdown pass from Orton to Stokley with 0:14 remaining in the game.

• Denver improves its record to 3-0 with a 23-3 victory at Oakland. Orton completes 13 of 23 passes for a paltry 157 yards, but Denver dominates on the ground with Correll Buckhalter recording a 109 yards on 14 carries and Knowshon Moreno rushing for 90 yards on 21 attempts.

October 2009:

• After the Broncos beat New England 20-17 in overtime to improve to 5-0, McDaniels celebrates with tactless fist pumping while running around Invesco Field at Mile High as if he were Cal Ripken, Jr. after breaking Lou Gehrig’s record for consecutive games played. It seems that Brandon Marshall is in the coach’s good graces after catching 8 passes for 64 yards and 2 scores, and the two men embrace after Marshall’s second touchdown.

• Denver improves its record to 6-0 after traveling to San Diego and defeating the Chargers 34-23. Though seeing a significantly reduced role on offense, Eddie Royal (only 1 year removed from a stellar 91 reception rookie campaign), contributes to the victory by returning both a kickoff and punt for a touchdown.

November 2009:

• Coming off of a bye week, the Broncos are demolished at Baltimore, 30-7. Denver struggles to establish its running game and McDaniels calls for Orton to throw the ball 32 times. Orton completes 23 of such attempts but for only 157 yards, averaging an anemic 4.1 yards per attempt.

• Denver drops to 6-2, losing to the Steelers at home on Monday Night Football. Kyle Orton throws 3 interceptions and posts a quarterback rating of 43.9.

• Chris Simms, who McDaniels signed to a lucrative free agent contract, is terrible in relief of an injured Kyle Orton at Washington. Simms looks lost on the field, completing only 3 of 13 passes for 13 yards and an interception. In addition to the Orton injury, the 27-17 loss is largely a result of Washington’s conversion of a fake field goal. On the play, Redskins punter, Hunter Smith, throws a 40 yard touchdown to fullback Mike Sellers from the fake formation Washington showed prior to calling a timeout. McDaniels opts to not use a Denver timeout after the Redskins again line up in the same fake field goal formation subsequent to the Washington timeout and Alphonso Smith blows the coverage on Sellers.

• McDaniels immaturely engages in trash talking with Shaun Phillips prior to Denver losing 32-3 at Mile High to division rival San Diego. The loss is Denver’s 4th straight, and allows San Diego to take a 1 game lead in the AFC West race after having trailed the Broncos by 3.5 games only 5 weeks earlier.

December 2009:

• After posting wins in Weeks 12 and 13 to improve to 8-4, Denver drops its Week 14 game at Indianapolis 27-17, despite great performances from the defense (3 interceptions of Peyton Manning) and Brandon Marshall, who sets the single-game receptions record with 21 catches for 200 yards and 2 touchdowns. Marshall’s record setting day is overshadowed, however, by strong criticism of McDaniels, specifically targeting the coach’s: (i) decision to defer to the second half after winning the coin toss prior to the start of the game (resulting in a quick touchdown drive led by Manning), and (ii) refusal to use reserve running back Peyton Hillis despite the struggles of rookie Knowshon Moreno (67 yards on 23 attempts for a deplorable 2.7 yards per carry average) and losing Correll Buckhalter to injury early in the contest.

• Needing a win to remain in control of the AFC wild card race, the Broncos embarrassingly lose 20-19 to Oakland after JaMarcus Russell throws a touchdown pass to Chaz Schilens with 0:45 remaining in the 4th quarter. Russell, effectively third on the Raiders depth chart at the quarterback position, enters the game after Charlie Frye (starting for an injured Bruce Gradkowski) suffers a concussion. The Raiders rush for 241 yards while Moreno continues to struggle (particularly in short yardage situations), gaining only 42 yards on 19 carries (2.2 yards per carry average). McDaniels is booed off the field, and Denver Post columnist Dave Kreiger calls out the head coach for his stubbornness and examines the drop-off in production of Shanahan holdovers Hillis, Royal, Scheffler, and Stokley under McDaniels.

• Fans continue to voice displeasure over McDaniels’ coaching and play-calling, primarily taking issue with the lack of downfield passing attempts, and struggles of the running game (primarily due to McDaniels’ decision to not use the zone blocking scheme favored by Shanahan and best suited to Denver’s current offensive line, and opposing defenses stacking the box with little or no threat of a downfield pass).

• Denver is on the outside of the AFC wild card race after suffering a morale crushing loss at Philadelphia. David Akers kicks a 28-yard field goal with 4 seconds remaining in the game, lifting the Eagles to a 30-27 victory and spoiling Dawkins’ emotional return to Philadelphia after Denver had rallied to tie the game at 6:05 of the 4th quarter. While the Broncos erased a 27-10 deficit, this game will most be remembered for Kyle Orton’s failure to make plays down the stretch (i.e. in the 4th quarter, Denver managed to score only 3 points on three drives that started at the Philadelphia 44, Denver 47, and Denver 44, respectively).

January 2010:

• On the Friday before the team’s must win game to keep its playoff chances alive vs. Kansas City, McDaniels announces that Marshall and Scheffler will be not be active for the game as a result of the players’ poor attitudes. McDaniels is widely criticized for publicly questioning the legitimacy of Marshall’s hamstring injury.

• Without Marshall and Scheffler in the lineup, the Broncos are lambasted 44-24 by a Chiefs team that came into the game with a 3-13 record. In Kansas City’s first victory in 9 tries at Invesco Field at Mile High, Jamaal Charles rushes for a Chiefs record 259 yards on 25 carries and linebacker Derrick Johnson scores two touchdowns on returns of interceptions of terrible Kyle Orton throws. Orton finishes the game with a total of 3 interceptions and a quarterback rating of 65.4.

• The Broncos finish the season with an 8-8 record, joining the 1978 Redskins and 2003 Vikings as the only teams since the 1970 AFL-NFL merger to miss the playoffs after a 6-0 start.

• Kyle Orton completes the season with respectable totals of 3,802 yards, 21 touchdowns, and 12 interceptions; however, it is painfully clear that Orton’s decision making, footwork and pocket awareness are generally poor, and the majority of his passes are wildly inaccurate. Orton lacks mobility and cannot consistently make plays downfield. By all accounts Orton is well liked by teammates and is thorough in preparing for games, but Peter King writes the truth when he opines in his January 4, 2010 MMQB “[Orton has] proven this year he’s a borderline starter, not a player a team can build a long future around.”

• To the dismay of the Broncos community, Josh McDaniels endorses Kyle Orton as the Broncos starting quarterback of the future. In response to McDaniels endorsement of Orton, Dave Kreiger writes that if the Denver Broncos want to win another Vince Lombardi Trophy, the franchise needs an elite quarterback. In the last decade only two Super Bowl winning quarterbacks are in the non-elite category, Trent Dilfer of the Ravens and Brad Johnson of the Buccaneers, and both Dilfer and Johnson benefited from playing on teams that had ultra-elite defenses (not to mention Dilfer and Johnson were better players than Orton). The other eight Super Bowl winners of the past decade are Tom Brady (3), Ben Roethlisberger (2), Peyton Manning, Eli Manning and Kurt Warner.

• The only two position coaches remaining from Mike Shanahan’s staff, running backs coach, Bobby Turner, and offensive line coach, Rick Dennison, depart Denver. Turner accepts an offer from the Washington Redskins to be an associate head coach on Shanahan’s staff, and Dennison joins Gary Kubiak in Houston as the Texans’ offensive coordinator replacing Kyle Shanahan.

• The Broncos and defensive coordinator Mike Nolan “mutually agree to part ways.” The shocking move comes after a season in which Nolan’s presence increased the team’s ranking in total defense from No. 29 in 2008 to No. 7 in 2009, and improved the Broncos from a Defense-adjusted Value Over Average (DVOA) of 24.7% in 2008 to -7.9% in 2009 (tied with the Saints for the most significant improvement in total defense from ’08 to ’09). Though a reason for the separation isn’t offered by McDaniels or Nolan, it is believed that Nolan’s departure is a result of a combination of the following factors: (i) McDaniels’ inability to delegate responsibility to the amply qualified defensive coordinator (and former head coach of the San Francisco 49ers) and pompous attitude made it absolutely insufferable for Nolan to continue overseeing the Broncos defense, and (ii) McDaniels was on the verge of hiring former Patriots defensive coordinator, Dean Pees, as associate head coach, a move that clearly would have undermined the authority of (and alienated) Mike Nolan.

• McDaniels promotes his younger brother, Ben, to quarterbacks coach. Before being hired by the Broncos last year as an offensive assistant, the 30 year old Ben McDaniels’ coaching experience consisted of 3 years coaching quarterbacks at the high school level in Ohio and 2 years as a graduate assistant at the of Minnesota. Unfortunately, rather than hiring a quarterbacks coach best qualified and skilled to mentor a young player (e.g. Jim Zorn), McDaniels again opted to surround himself with familiarity to ensure that that his methods and decisions are not challenged.

• Dean Pees, Josh McDaniels top choice to replace Mike Nolan as defensive coordinator of the Broncos, snubs McDaniels and accepts a lesser position (linebackers coach) on John Harbaugh’s staff in Baltimore. Though many Broncos fans are thankful the conformist Pees will not be running the defense in Denver, Pees’ decision speaks volumes about McDaniels, confirming the notion that: (i) McDaniels inability to get along with star players may extend to not being able to work well alongside assistant coaches, and/or (ii) NFL insiders are not optimistic about the direction and future success of the Broncos under McDaniels’ leadership.

• The Broncos name Don Martindale defensive coordinator. Martindale was hired by Denver before last season to coach the linebackers after serving in the same capacity for the Oakland Raiders since 2004. He was last a defensive coordinator at Western Kentucky University in 2003. While Martindale may prove to be a creditable successor to Nolan, the stink of McDaniels’ choice to jettison Nolan will linger for some time.

March 2010:

• Denver’s election to qualify Brandon Marshall with only the first-round tender has many league observers concluding that such decision was reached solely to make signing Marshall to an offer sheet more palatable to other NFL teams. Kyle Orton was also assigned a first-round, $2.521 million tender.

• In an attempt to remake the defensive line, the Broncos sign unrestricted free agents defensive end/defensive tackle Justin Bannan (Baltimore), defensive end Jarvis Green (New England), and defensive tackle Jamal Williams (San Diego). While such signings are met with optimism, all three players are 30 years or older. Denver also signs cornerback Nate Jones, formerly of the Dolphins, to compete for the team’s nickel corner spot. The signing of Jones does not bode well for Alphonso Smith (effectively a first-round selection as a result of a draft day trade that sent Denver’s 2010 1st round selection to Seattle for the 37th overall pick) who could not get on the field in his first season, playing behind veteran Ty Law and undrafted rookie free agent Tony Carter.

• Despite McDaniels stating that he planned to expand Peyton Hillis’ role in the offense in 2010, the popular running back was traded to Cleveland for Brady Quinn. Given that Hillis was unlikely to see an increase in opportunities in 2010 because Josh McDaniels Sucks, the acquisition of Brady Quinn is met with the approval of most Broncos fans. The good news out of Dove Valley is that Denver is actively searching for a long term replacement for Kyle Orton, who confirmed last season he’s a borderline starter at the NFL level. Whether Brady Quinn is the solution is another question entirely. As Denver Post columnist Dave Krieger offered “[t]o call [Quinn] the Anna Kournikova of pro football would be too strong, but there are similarities. His looks have made him a bigger player in the commercial endorsement world than on the football field, where he has struggled since turning pro three years ago.”

April 2010:

• As anticipated for months, McDaniels trades Pro Bowl wideout Brandon Marshall to Miami for a second round draft pick in 2010 and 2011. Marshall and the Dolphins quikly agree on the terms of a new contract. Despite Marshall’s agent, Kennard McGuire, floating rumors that the agreement makes Marshall the highest paid wide receiver in the history of the NFL, the deal is effectively for 2 years with $12.5 million guaranteed. If Miami decides to keep Marshall past April 2, 2011 (after having two years to test drive Marshall both on and off the field), another $9.5 million in guaranteed base salaries will be due to Marshall. Considering the true value and structure of the contract, it’s a travesty that Denver didn’t sign Marshall to this deal rather than jettisoning another Pro Bowl player. Miami was able to manage risk knowing the immense talent of Marshall, so why not the Broncos? Perhaps, because Josh McDaniels is overcompensating for his vast shortcomings with an insatiable desire for power, control and authority.

• After trading down twice in the first round of the 2010 NFL draft to select Demaryius Thomas (WR, Georgia Tech), McDaniels blows the extra picks Denver accumulated in such trades and shocks the NFL world by moving back into the first round to select former Florida Gators quarterback Tim Tebow. Tebow is a long way from developing into a functional NFL quarterback and many league insiders believe that the player could have been had for a single pick in round 2 or 3. McDaniels’ deal for Tebow deal is reminiscent of the 2009 draft when McDaniels panicked and shipped the team’s 2010 first round pick to Seattle to take diminutive defensive back Alphonso Smith. As a result, Seattle received the No. 14 overall pick in this year’s draft and selected Texas safety Earl Thomas, a player NFL Network analyst Mike Mayock labeled the best pure, instinctive football player in the 2010 draft.

August 2010:

• Tim Tebow’s preseason was largely shaky as the former Florida Gators quarterback reverted back to his poor college form during game action, dipping the ball down below his waist and using a windmill-like motion to deliver the pass. There were a few highlights in Tebow’s play though it’s rather apparent that Tebow is lacking the skill set and physical and mental attributes necessary to be a successful NFL quarterback.

September 2010:

• The Broncos trade cornerback Alphonso Smith to Detroit for the Lions fourth string tight end, Dan Gronkowski. Gronkowski was Detroit’s 7th round (255th overall) pick in 2009. While McDaniels effectively admitted his colossal mistake of trading Denver’s 2010 1st round draft pick to select Smith in the top of round two in ‘09, a backup tight end is a horrendous return on a draft pick that could have resulted in a talent such as Earl Thomas on the Broncos roster. SI.com’s Peter King pokes fun at the Broncos front office by giving the Personnel Acumen Award to McDaniels and general manager Brian Xanders for the Alphonso Smith trade and the free agent signing of defensive end Jarvis Green, who received $3.2 million in guarantees but never played a regular-season snap for the team.

October 2010:

• The Broncos suffer the worst and most humiliating home defeat in the history of the franchise, a 59-14 drubbing by the Oakland Raiders, a team that recorded only 10 first downs and 3 field goals in a 17-9 loss to the 1-5 San Francisco 49ers the previous week. Broncos fans are outraged with the pathetic showing and the team’s 4-13 record over the last 365 days under McDaniels, resulting in widespread media coverage of the mutiny brewing in Denver.

November 2010:

• The Denver Broncos and head coach Josh McDaniels were each fined $50,000 by the NFL for violating the league’s “integrity of the game” policy, as McDaniels failed to timely report the recording of a 49ers walk-through practice by the team’s director of video operations, Steve Scarnecchia. Scarnecchia was fired after asserting he acted alone.

December 2010:

• Pat Bowlen fires Josh McDaniels on December 6, 2010.

Posted by Uncle Rico 01/09/10 4:56 PM ET
Edited by Uncle Rico 12/08/10 2:00 PM ET

and Marshall were the future of the franchise, how soon you forget that Cutler was hated by all the other Broncos players and Marshall couldn’t stay out of jail. So, McD wisely gave Cutler the boot, brought in Orton, and was chastised for it. Now look at the stats…Orton has better numbers than Cutler in the two years since he has replaced him, and has better numbers than Cutler’s two “outstanding” seasons in Denver.
  1.  

  2. Dadrunamok says:
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I'd take Mcdaniels over any of the other guys they've been rumored to be bringing in for an interview. I think he's a good coach, just a lousy player personel guy, and he wont have to worry about that aspect here.

Right, we already have a lousy player personell guy in place.

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It's McDaniels, the guy they really wanted last year. I'm all for it. I say draft Manziel, Beckham, and Carlos Hyde (or best back) and let'er roll. Sounds like a party to me. Sure, we'll be "brash," with McDaniels and Johnny Football. Sure, we'll have attitude and fire. Somebody thinks that's bad?

 

As far as other less pressing needs (another corner, another ILB, another OL, maybe a joker TE), we've got two thirds, two fourths, and a bajillion dollars to spend, more than anybody else.

 

Along with five Pro Bowlers and an alternate, the next coach is gonna look like a genius, whoever it is. Teams gonna be crazy talented.

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McDaniels singlehandedly put the Broncos back 4yrs

 

How did he put the Broncos back four years when they beat the Steelers in the playoffs the very next year? (and followed that up with a couple 13-3 seasons)

 

You haven't been back to the playsoffs since, Tomlin has set you back three years and counting ...

 

Zombo

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Tired of the nice guys and where they finish. Belichick learned a lot from his stint in Cleveland and seems to have done pretty well with his 2nd chance.

 

Which (as has been pointed out) has nothing to do with his coaching tree's success... or rather lack of it.

 

McDaniels - no freakin way. Browns fans will be chanting "We want Chud back" pretty quickly.

 

McDaniels is too arrogant, too young. But I can see that Banner and Lombardi would think

he'd fit right in with them on the golf course...

 

Agree... and how could McD's arrogance co-exist with the FO's???

 

 

Intreresting local tidbit from the Boston Globe. Here's an excerpt:

 

"Josh McDaniels should be skeptical of Browns"

Maybe if McDaniels could look into his crystal ball and see who his quarterback would be with the Browns in 2014, then the job would be intriguing. Otherwise, there is too much uncertainty at quarterback and too much of a circus-like atmosphere to make it an attractive job. McDaniels has a good thing going in New England and can remain patient if he so chooses.

 

http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2013/12/30/browns-interested-josh-mcdaniels-coaching-vacancies-abound/TTbQgpJ5LjrMmsrbrDoQKI/story.html

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Which (as has been pointed out) has nothing to do with his coaching tree's success... or rather lack of it.

 

 

 

Just as his coaching tree's success has nothing to do with how the next guy will perform. It would be no different if every one of his disciples had done great too.......It wouldn't mean the next guy would also be great. McDaniels made mistakes his first time around, and like anyone, should have learned from those mistakes.

 

That being said, I'm not banging the McDaniels drum by any means, but I think the choice has already been made long before the announcement of Chud's firing. They didn't decide to fire him on Sunday, it was just announced on Sunday. He's been gone for a long time and the replacement has been in place equally as long IMO.

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I believe Chud was never going to get a second year.

 

That Banner wants somebody only available this year, and Chud

was a fill in for one year.

 

That explains a lot.

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Which (as has been pointed out) has nothing to do with his coaching tree's success... or rather lack of it.

 

 

Agree... and how could McD's arrogance co-exist with the FO's???

 

 

Intreresting local tidbit from the Boston Globe. Here's an excerpt:

 

"Josh McDaniels should be skeptical of Browns"

Maybe if McDaniels could look into his crystal ball and see who his quarterback would be with the Browns in 2014, then the job would be intriguing. Otherwise, there is too much uncertainty at quarterback and too much of a circus-like atmosphere to make it an attractive job. McDaniels has a good thing going in New England and can remain patient if he so chooses.

 

http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2013/12/30/browns-interested-josh-mcdaniels-coaching-vacancies-abound/TTbQgpJ5LjrMmsrbrDoQKI/story.html

That is just the ignorance and arrogance of the Boston media speaking. The New England job is no better than the Browns job....with one exception: right now McDaniels has Tom Brady to work with. But that won't be the case in a few years. McD will want to work with his own Tom Brady type player (and even he is smart enough to know that a player of that caliber is more likely to be chosen with a high first round pick....not a 6th rounder like Brady.....a pick that the Browns will have, not NE.

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Well , we just got permission to interview him form the Pats ... I think he's the guy.

 

I actually don't think it's a bad hire: Cleveland roots, smart guy that was hopefully humbled from his Denver experience and has wizened up on how to treat NFL players ... I think the Three Stooges admire him ... But ... wasn't he available last year?

 

#ThankYouForWastingAYearOfOurLives.

 

Zombo

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Well , we just got permission to interview him form the Pats ... I think he's the guy.

 

I actually don't think it's a bad hire: Cleveland roots, smart guy that was hopefully humbled from his Denver experience and has wizened up on how to treat NFL players ... I think the Three Stooges admire him ... But ... wasn't he available last year?

 

#ThankYouForWastingAYearOfOurLives.

 

Zombo

Of course he's a smart guy. He went to THE John Carroll University. Only geniuses who are incredibly good-looking go there.

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Of course he's a smart guy. He went to THE John Carroll University. Only geniuses who are incredibly good-looking go there.

He has better roots than that: He and I were born in the same hospital. He lived in my sister in law's neighborhood at the time. She remembers him riding his bike around the neighborhood and passing out Halloween candy to him.

 

So? Does that mean since he went to John Carroll that he will become the next Don Shula? (If he comes here....hopefully so)

 

He actually lived in a neighborhood that would have sent him to GlenOak schools....but because his Dad was the coach at Canton McKinley, apparently he was allowed to attend that HS.

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Well , we just got permission to interview him form the Pats ... I think he's the guy.

 

I actually don't think it's a bad hire: Cleveland roots, smart guy that was hopefully humbled from his Denver experience and has wizened up on how to treat NFL players ... I think the Three Stooges admire him ... But ... wasn't he available last year?

 

#ThankYouForWastingAYearOfOurLives.

 

Zombo

 

He took his name out of all head coaching consideration last year. He was our third choice, but he said he was happy where he was.

 

I think it's a load of shit.

 

I think he was afraid of an evaluation year and the FO knew it, so they hired Chud as a fall guy. Chud was never in this FO's long term plans. If he won 12 games, then he would get to stay. If he didn't, well...we know what happened.

 

 

It's not hard to imagine that this FO secretly spoke with McDaniels last year, he said he wanted to take the job but wouldn't take it because he didn't want to go through an evaluation year, so the FO brought in Chud to take the lumps and see what we had as far as talent. Then Chud gets dumped after one year after conveniently blowing 8 straight, McDaniels comes in and gets the guy he's been touting since last year (Manziel) plus a WR in the first (Evans) and a RB in the second, and he suddenly has his franchise QB, the #1 WR in the league, a first-round rookie WR, a Pro Bowl TE, a Pro Bowl LT, a Pro Bowl C, and a second round rookie RB. And in case Manziel fails, we conveniently have Brian Hoyer to fill in, the guy Lombardi has been claiming is a NFL starting QB for years.

 

 

Then McDaniels takes that high powered offense and pairs it with our very solid defense and wins the AFC North next season, and now Lombardi looks like a genius because he's been touting McDaniels since Day 1.

 

 

Honestly, how can anyone not see that?

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Actually, I think the better question is "What's wrong with that?" It results in a better team and some success. The only significantly negative aspect to it would be that Chud got the shaft from the FO from the beginning, but I've already kind of accepted that.

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I'm on board with McDaniels. He seemed like a good coach in Denver, but was HORRIBLE with the rest of the responsibility he took on. If all he has to do is focus on football, then he might turn out to be pretty good.

 

I'd like to see him keep Horton and his staff around. I know some people weren't impressed, but seriously can we do any better?

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Actually, I think the better question is "What's wrong with that?" It results in a better team and some success. The only significantly negative aspect to it would be that Chud got the shaft from the FO from the beginning, but I've already kind of accepted that.

 

 

I don't have a problem with it at all, outside of Chud getting the shaft, as you said.

 

 

If I were in McDaniels situation, I'd do the same thing. If it leads to us being perennial playoff contenders, then it doesn't matter. There's no room in the game for niceties.

 

I just would rather see us get Brett Hundley or Blake Bortles, but I am (very slightly) warming up to the idea of Manziel. He's still my fourth choice, but he's at least been upgraded from "absolutely, positively, no way".

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He has better roots than that: He and I were born in the same hospital. He lived in my sister in law's neighborhood at the time. She remembers him riding his bike around the neighborhood and passing out Halloween candy to him.

 

So? Does that mean since he went to John Carroll that he will become the next Don Shula? (If he comes here....hopefully so)

 

He actually lived in a neighborhood that would have sent him to GlenOak schools....but because his Dad was the coach at Canton McKinley, apparently he was allowed to attend that HS.

I'm from Canton too and teach at McKinley now. Everyone in Stark County knows the McDaniels name.

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Browns wanted McDaniels last year after the less realistic star fucking. Banner and Lombardi love him and he made a ton of sense. There are some nice stats on guys getting their second chance as a head coach with a little space in between. So much to learn and then some time to process it... and who better to process with than Belicheck, the prime example of a Second Chancer?

 

Assuming it's McDaniels, expect the Browns to be forward thinking at the quarterback position. Nobody's run the spread more than McDaniels (in New England) and nobody's found a way to win with Tebow except McDaniels, an early adaptor to the RO.

 

Man, if that doesn't scream Johnny Manziel, I don't know what does. Could be Mariota, who just might reverse field and come out. Or maybe Brett Hundley gets a year to watch because his ceiling is the highest in the draft. Point being, we won't mind all that much if Jacksonville takes Blake Bortles as many are now suggesting.

 

But with the talent this team will have accumulated by July (6 Pro Bowlers, 40-some mill in cap, 10 draft picks), I think I could win 8 or 9 games next year.

 

PS: I agree with Couch to an extent. One thing McDaniels has learned from his travels away from and back to Tom Brady is you ain't winning jack squat without the quarterback. He didn't think the Browns had one and didn't see one in the draft.

 

Now he does.

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Browns wanted McDaniels last year after the less realistic star fucking. Banner and Lombardi love him and he made a ton of sense. There are some nice stats on guys getting their second chance as a head coach with a little space in between. So much to learn and then some time to process it... and who better to process with than Belicheck, the prime example of a Second Chancer?

 

Assuming it's McDaniels, expect the Browns to be forward thinking at the quarterback position. Nobody's run the spread more than McDaniels (in New England) and nobody's found a way to win with Tebow except McDaniels, an early adaptor to the RO.

 

Man, if that doesn't scream Johnny Manziel, I don't know what does. Could be Mariota, who just might reverse field and come out. Or maybe Brett Hundley gets a year to watch because his ceiling is the highest in the draft. Point being, we won't mind all that much if Jacksonville takes Blake Bortles as many are now suggesting.

 

But with the talent this team will have accumulated by July (6 Pro Bowlers, 40-some mill in cap, 10 draft picks), I think I could win 8 or 9 games next year.

 

PS: I agree with Couch to an extent. One thing McDaniels has learned from his travels away from and back to Tom Brady is you ain't winning jack squat without the quarterback. He didn't think the Browns had one and didn't see one in the draft.

 

Now he does.

Now he'll have two. One being the guy Lombardi loves and the other being the guy that fits McDaniels spread system perfectly and is the unorthodox QB that he likes.

 

And the third QB will be the one that erases the curse God put on Cleveland

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McDaniels reminded me a lot of Butch Davis when he was in Denver, he should've learned from Butch's mistakes. I don't foresee the FO allowing him to have a my way or the highway attitude here. This is Joe Banner's team without a shadow of doubt, and Let's just hope he can find good "value" in a QB this offseason.

 

With our FO and we end up with MickeyDees and Johnny football the level of douche baggery on this team will be at an all time high . . . Probably a high enough level to convert some steeler fans.

 

At this point they could put Chud's grandma on the sideline and put a trained monkey behind center and I would be happy as long as they were winners.

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Monkeys are elusive = less sacks

 

Monkeys are great problem solvers = defenses read, in turn less ints

 

Monkeys are very tough and durable = less injury

 

Monkeys are capable of learning and adapting = less seeing the same shit week in and week out

 

Also, as far as I know there are no monkeys, named Brandon Weeden or Jason Campbell

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As I just said in the Manziel thread, why not? We keep trying these first time coaches with clean pasts so let's bring in McDaniels. The hire looks stupid on paper with his history, but again this is something the Browns haven't tried yet. The guy obviously has knowledge of the offense in the NFL and would make a system to fit Manziel if we drafted him. This might be the shit to get the Browns going, at least it will be fresh and new.

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didn't Lombardi draft a couple of decent guys also? Mangini? Heckert? Al Davis? I think everyone gets lucky as some point.

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